1812 Productions welcomes the resident artists of the 2019 Jilline Ringle Solo Performance Program

1812 Productions welcomes the resident artists of the 2019 Jilline Ringle Solo Performance Program

1812 Productions is pleased to announce the residents of the 2019 Jilline Ringle Solo Performance Program. The summer residencies provide essential time and space for artists to continue development of original solo works. This year, 1812 Productions and the Advisory Board of the Jilline Ringle Solo Performance Program are pleased to award residencies to Brett Robinson, Jessica Johnson, TS Hawkins, and Gwendolyn Rice. The summer residencies will take place from Saturday, July 6th through Sunday, July 14th at 1812 Productions' rehearsal studio in South Philadelphia.

Instructions, Mysteries, and Putting It Together from David Bradley

Instructions, Mysteries, and Putting It Together from David Bradley

 Those big stores with the long shelves filled with flat-packed boxes and alluring displays of furniture prompt two opposing feelings in me: my life will now be neatly put together AND I’ll never be able to figure this all out. I can envision new space, new order. Then I picture allen wrenches and particle board and missing pegs and wordless instructions. And I get afraid.

What makes a Broad, Five questions with MB Scallen

What makes a Broad, Five questions with MB Scallen

Broads is a comedy cabaret celebrating bold female comedians from the 1920s through the 1960s. The show is directed by Jennifer Childs and stars Jess Conda, Joilet Harris, and MB Scallen and features material from more than a dozen comedians including Sophie Tucker, Moms Mabley, Mae West, and many more.

The history of women in comedy has long been a favorite subject at 1812 Productions and has inspired several projects over the past 15 years. Before rehearsals began for Broads, we asked each of the performers five questions about what makes a broad a Broad. We loved their responses so much, we’re sharing them here.

What makes a Broad, Five questions with Joilet Harris

What makes a Broad, Five questions with Joilet Harris

Broads is a comedy cabaret celebrating bold female comedians from the 1920s through the 1960s. The show is directed by Jennifer Childs and stars Jess Conda, Joilet Harris, and MB Scallen and features material from more than a dozen comedians including Sophie Tucker, Moms Mabley, Mae West, and many more.

The history of women in comedy has long been a favorite subject at 1812 Productions and has inspired several projects over the past 15 years. Before rehearsals began for Broads, we asked each of the performers five questions about what makes a broad a Broad. We loved their responses so much, we’re sharing them here.

What makes a Broad, Five questions with Jess Conda

What makes a Broad, Five questions with Jess Conda

Broads is a comedy cabaret celebrating bold female comedians from the 1920s through the 1960s. The show is directed by Jennifer Childs and stars Jess Conda, Joilet Harris, and MB Scallen and features material from more than a dozen comedians including Sophie Tucker, Moms Mabley, Mae West, and many more.

The history of women in comedy has long been a favorite subject at 1812 Productions and has inspired several projects over the past 15 years. Before rehearsals began for Broads, we asked each of the performers five questions about what makes a broad a Broad. We loved their responses so much, we’re sharing them here.

Special Skills by Dave Jadico

Special Skills by Dave Jadico

For the 2013 production of 1812’s The Big Time, Scott, Jen and I took two months of dance lessons to learn the opening act of the show, a cross-dressed, three-person tango. I’ve had to learn how to play klezmer clarinet for a production with EgoPo, upright bass for a show at the Walnut, do a Pakistani accent for a show at InterAct, to sing in Russian for a show at the Lantern, and to play the duduk, an ancient, Armenian double-reed wind instrument at the Arden. All, for the most part, are now listed in my Special Skills.

Esperanza y Gravedad, Entrevista con Michael Hollinger, por Fernando Mendez

Esperanza y Gravedad, Entrevista con Michael Hollinger, por Fernando Mendez

“Lo que es interesante, para mí, es que en la tradición clásica de la escritura de dramas, los personajes avanzan en el tiempo, encuentran obstáculos y los superan. Y plantea preguntas en las cabezas de la audiencia: ¿vengará Hamlet la muerte de su padre? Esas preguntas son sobre el resultado y son importantes para nosotros. Hope and Gravity subvierten eso, porque hay preguntas más pequeñas en las que dices ... Me pregunto si esta gente se va a casar, o me pregunto si este asunto será descubierto. No hay clímax clásico en la obra, ningún lugar donde se respondan todas las preguntas en una gran batalla…”

Hope and Gravity, an Interview, from Fernando Mendez and Michael Hollinger

Hope and Gravity, an Interview, from Fernando Mendez and Michael Hollinger

“What is interesting about it, for me, is that in the classic tradition of play writing, the characters are moving forward through time, encountering obstacles and overcoming them. And it raises questions in the audiences heads—Will Hamlet avenge his father’s death? Those questions are about outcome and they are important to us. Hope and Gravity subverts that, because there are smaller questions where you say...I wonder if these people are going to get married, or I wonder if this affair will be discovered. There is no classic climax in the play, no place where all questions are answered in a big battle…”

We are not so far apart, from Mary Carpenter

We are not so far apart, from Mary Carpenter

"How could a movie released 57 years earlier resonate so fully with a teenager bred on the immediacy of YouTube personalities and memes? Simple, good writing is good writing. Writing that trusts the audience and presents them with recognizable surprise, new takes on the experiences we have every day will stand the test of time. We recognize the players and the situations, but the lens through which they present it underlines a familiar and often universal experience in a surprising way. This is at the heart of A Few of Our Favorite Things, Jen Childs and Tony Braithwaite’s newest cabaret."

Dreaming up The Puzzle, from Juliette Dunn

Dreaming up The Puzzle, from Juliette Dunn

When I first began dreaming up The Puzzle, my son was very young.  I was living in a bizarre world of unusual behaviors that became my norm, and aside from the pain and worry and sadness, there was joy and laughter.  It felt like I was living in some absurd play that constantly swung between that pain and laughter.  There were so many stories of children 'coming out of autism' and recovering completely. I believed that we would be able to bring our son out of his autism, too.  I wanted to document this journey in a play about solving a puzzle from the perspective of a boy with autism.

The Magic of Monday, from Actor/ Educator Emily Kleimo

The Magic of Monday, from Actor/ Educator Emily Kleimo

"Widener is a unique place. The school was founded in 1902 and is specifically for students with physical, medical and mental disabilities. The student body represents a wide range of abilities and socio-economic backgrounds. Regardless of a student’s individual needs, the goal is to help each pupil reach their potential through the various programming and therapy offered at Widener. 1812 Outreach gets to be a variable in that equation once a week throughout the school year."

Empezó de hablar sobre imaginación, de Chris Davis

Empezó de hablar sobre imaginación, de Chris Davis

"Empezó de hablar sobre imaginación, como puede ver cosas en sus mentes pero no tiene que ver los en realidad.  Yo digo a todos que cierran los ojos y imaginan París.  Digo que por 30 segundos nosotros usamos los imaginaciones, y en este clase no hay examen, no hay libros, estamos aquí para divertirnos, y imaginación es la alma del ser humano.  Todos tiene imaginación, y especialmente cuando eramos niños, y el mundo han dicho que es tonto o no es tan chido, pero ni modos todavía los tenemos, adentro."

See things without ‘seeing’ them, from Actor/Educator Chris Davis

See things without ‘seeing’ them, from Actor/Educator Chris Davis

"I suddenly launch into a speech about imagination, about how you can see things without ‘seeing’ them.  I make everyone close their eyes and imagine Paris.  I talk about how for the next 30 minutes we will use our imaginations, that in this class there are no tests, there are no books, that we are here to have fun, and that imagination is at the very soul of human experience.  That we all possess it, and especially when we were children, and that we’ve been told it’s stupid or not cool, but we still have it, buried beneath us."